Consortium

Consortium

The UQ project connects applied researchers from four research fields—Earth & Environment, Energy, Health, and Information—among each other, with Helmholtz Association data science experts, and with external university partners from mathematics and econometrics.

Consortium Members

Represented by:

  • Dr. Lars Nerger

The Alfred-Wegener-Institute focuses on polar and marine research. Within the Helmholtz UQ project, the uncertainty connected to predictions and projections of Earth system behavior are investigated by means of data assimilation techniques. You can read more about the research on the project page.

Represented by:

The IEK-STE and IEK-10 of Forschungszentrum Jülich research the operation and dynamics of energy systems under uncertainties. They contribute their expertise about electrical power-grid systems (IEK-STE) and scheduling methods for energy systems (IEK-10) to the Helmholtz UQ project. Here, the investigation is focused on the effects of intermittent renewable energy production and their handling in these systems. You can read more about the research on the project page.

Represented by:

The GFZ, Section 2.4 Seismology investigates the Earth’s dynamic processes to assess earthquake hazards. In the Helmholtz UQ project, they will improve the understanding of these processes by evaluating uncertainty in seismic data and its effect on the ability to image the current seismic structure of the lithosphere. You can read more about the research on the project page.

Represented by:

  • Jordan A. Gault
  • PD Dr. Jan Freund (partner)
  • Prof. Dr. Helmut Hillebrand

By analyzing the functional role of biodiversity in marine ecosystems and understanding the general principles constraining this role, the HIFMB establishes the necessary knowledge and tools to predict future changes in biodiversity and ecosystem function. Within the Helmholtz UQ project, research is focused on how various sources of uncertainty common to ecological datasets affect our ability to make accurate predictions about changes in biodiversity. You can read more about the research on the project page.

Represented by:

Helmholtz Zentrum München works to discover personalized medical solutions for the prevention and therapy of environmentally triggered diseases with the aim to promote a healthier society in an uncertain world. HMGU’s focus on uncertainty in the health domain, especially in single-cell RNA biology, leads to a strategic alliance with the Helmholtz UQ project. HMGU also contributes to the project with its Core Facility Statistical Consulting’s expertise. You can read more about the research on the project page.

Represented by:

Metallic Biomaterials is a sub-institute of the Institute for Materials Research at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG). Metallic Biomaterials investigates and develops new implant materials based on titanium and magnesium. They contribute their expertise in the field of magnesium-based biodegradable implants to the Helmholtz UQ project. In this project they investigate the uncertainties within in vitro degradation models and the possibilities to eliminate and optimize these models by integrating UQ methods within them. You can read more about the research on the project page.

Represented by:

At KIT, three institutions are contributing to the Helmholtz UQ project: the Steinbuch Centre for Computing (SCC), the Institute of Metererology and Climate Research - Atmospheric Trace Gases and Remote Sensing (IMK-ASF), and the Institute for Automation and Applied Informatics (IAI). SCC provides computing facilities for the processing and analysis of large-scale data for climate models designed at IMK-ASF, whereas IAI focuses on complex industrial processes. In the Helmholtz UQ project, they analyze the uncertainties related to these models and processes. You can read more about the research on the project page.

Represented by:

  • Prof. Dr. Peter Dietrich
  • Dr. Hendrik Paasche

Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ) has taken up the challenge of generating knowledge from raw images and mapping of earth surfaces for geo-scientific data. UFZ is investigating several different approaches to quantify the subjective and technical uncertainties in geo-scientific images.

Represented by:

Bielefeld University, one of Germany’s newer universities, focuses on interdisciplinary research. The Data Science chair contributes both application- and method-based expertise to the UQ project. The university also hosts the Collaborative Research Center (CRC 1283 “Taming uncertainty”), an interdisciplinary endeavor aiming to develop basic concepts and theories for dealing with “good” and “bad” uncertainty, which makes it an important collaborator to the UQ consortium.